20+ Valentine's Day Movies for a Cozy Night at Home

We skipped "The Notebook" and went for the true classics.

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Courtesy

These classic romances — some comedic, some tragic — will have you feeling all the feels (and sometimes ugly-sobbing right into your oversize knit blanket). So sit back, relax, and have those tissues ready!

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Courtesy of Warner Bros
"Casablanca" (1942)

Wartime passion, telltale letters and a love triangle make Casablanca an iconic romance — it swept at the 1944 Academy Awards, winning Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Screenplay. The chemistry between Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman doesn't hurt either. Film critic Roger Ebert summed up their performance nicely: "She paints his face with her eyes."

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"Cleopatra" (1963)

The onscreen romance between Cleopatra and Mark Antony is nothing compared to the epic real-life romance between lead actors Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. They met while filming the movie, setting off one of the most scandalous, dramatic Hollywood love affairs of all time.

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Courtesy of Warner Brothers
"Bonnie and Clyde" (1967)

The landmark film follows Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty as titular criminals Bonnie and Clyde. The often violent portrayal of their high-stakes robberies (and untimely end) was considered revolutionary at the time. The fatal attraction between the two characters even sparked something called "," which is basically being attracted to someone because they're dangerous. Romantic indeed.

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Courtesy of Embassy Pictures
"The Graduate" (1967)

Critics will always remain divided over whether this film can really be considered "romantic," but it's certainly an interesting study of relationships nonetheless. It's a captivating tale of a young man who begins an affair with an older woman, only to end up falling in love with her daughter.

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Courtesy of United Artists
"The Apartment" (1960)

Starring Shirley MacLaine and Jack Lemmon, The Apartment tells the story of a young businessman who allows his bosses to make use of his apartment for extramarital activities, in hopes that he'll be promoted. Of course, nothing is ever that easy and he ends up falling in love with the elevator operator, who unfortunately is having an affair with his boss. The film won several awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Screenplay.

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Courtesy of Castle Rock Entertainment
"Before Sunrise" (1995)

This film is a beautiful tale of two people who meet on a train, and spend a magical, crazy night wandering the streets of Vienna. It's the kind of movie that makes even the most practical person believe in whirlwind romance, making it a great Valentine's Day viewing choice. If you're really committed to cozying up for the night, you could make it a marathon with Before Sunset and Before Midnight, which follow the same couple.

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Courtesy of 20th Century Fox
"Say Anything" (1989)

The scene where Lloyd holds a boombox playing "In Your Eyes" below Diane's window is one of the most romantic movie moments of all time, in a film that Entertainment Weekly called the . It's a beautiful portrayal of young love and all that comes with it.

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United Artists via Public Theatre
"Last Tango in Paris" (1972)

Perfect for a steamy Valentine's Day date, this movie follows the story of two people who begin an affair in Paris, with the hopes of staying relatively unknown to each other. It doesn't go exactly as planned. The film itself is somewhat controversial, but could definitely spark a conversation (or spark some action) come V-Day.

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Courtesy of Castle Rock Entertainment
When Harry Met Sally (1989)

One of Nora Ephron's most famous and beloved works, this movie follows two people over several years as they go from irritating acquaintances to friends, to something more. Plus, it's got that famous Katz's Deli scene.

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Courtesy of Paramount Pictures
"Breakfast at Tiffany's" (1961)

Audrey Hepburn plays capricious Holly Golightly, a runaway socialite living in a New York City apartment (funded by, ahem, suspicious activity) in one her most idyllic roles. Paul "Fred" Varjak (George Peppard) is just as taken with her as we are. Our favorite highlight? Definitely the cat.

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Courtesy of Columbia Pictures
"The Way We Were" (1973)

Please, just rip my heart out now. Streisand and Redford take viewers on a heart-wrenching journey through love, reminding us that things don't have to work out for it to be beautiful. The ending hurts, but the couple's past — the "memmmmmmories!" — meant something (everything). And that song.

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Courtesy of United Artists
"Annie Hall" (1977)

Diane Keaton's charm and Woody Allen's deadpan self-depreciation make this romantic comedy, well, an unromantic comedy. The film follows two people who love each other on two sides of a divide, never able to meet in the middle. The film, however, was front and center at the 50th Academy Awards in 1978, where it was nominated in five categories — Keaton took home the statue for Best Actress.

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Courtesy of Paramount Pictures
"Funny Face" (1957)

This musical rom-com isn't much like its Broadway predecessor, but has the same male lead, Fred Astaire. The 1957 film follows a fashion magazine publisher, a photographer (Astaire) and an intellectual bookshop clerk turned model (Hepburn) on a revelatory journey to Paris. This one ends with the sweetest reunion. "I love your funny face," Astaire sings, as he finds Hepburn by a church in a couture wedding gown. "Your funny, sunny..." And then, that kiss.

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Courtesy of Vestron Pictures
"Dirty Dancing" (1987)

Dirty Dancing gave us major doses of Patrick Swayze's sex appeal — and his moves, of course — but also delivered one of the most iconic lines of all time: "No one puts Baby in a corner."

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"Gone with the Wind" (1939)

While (spoiler alert) there is no happy ending, Gone with the Wind is a whirlwind classic, with passion, devastating loss and scandal. Based on the 1936 novel by Margaret Mitchell, the epic Civil War period piece is nearly four hours long. Plan ahead if you have dinner reservations.

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Courtesy of Columbia Pictures
His Girl Friday (1940)

Cary Grant and Rosalind Russel play journalist exes covering the story of a murderer's execution. The only thing they're more passionate about than a juicy story is each other, making this romance a perfect V-Day flick.

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Courtesy of Paramount Pictures
"Great Gatsby" (1974)

This tormented love story, based on the novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, will have you seeing the (green) light. Mia Farrow and Robert Redford play Daisy Buchanan and Jay Gatsby, agonized lovers ripped apart by time, money and murder.

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"It Happened One Night" (1934)

It Happened One Night (1934) became the first film to win all five major Academy Awards, including Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Director, Best Picture and Best Screenplay, a feat that would not be repeated again until 1975 by One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. The film's success can be attributed to its stellar cast, namely Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert, but we bet their beautiful almost-didn't-happen romance has something to do with it.

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Courtesy of Allied Artists Productions
"Love in the Afternoon" (1957)

There's a reason why Audrey Hepburn appears on this list so many times — and that's because she's given us more stunning rom-coms than we know how to count. In Love in the Afternoon, she plays the deceptive Ariane Chavasse, a mock femme fatale who convinces her older lover of her involvement with dangerous men.

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Courtesy of MGM
"Moonstruck" (1987)

Moonstruck gives us a class love triangle between two brothers and one woman who must choose the man she was promised to or the man she loves. Cher and Nicholas Cage inspired many from critics and viewers alike — the film went on to be nominated for six Oscars, winning three for Best Actress (go, Cher!), Best Supporting Actress and Best Original Screenplay.

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"Romeo and Juliet" (1968)

There's never been a more tragic love story told than Shakespeare's tale of two star-crossed teenage lovers, ruined by family feud and fate. The 1968 version, directed by Franco Zeffirelli, was praised for its accurate depiction of a young Romeo and Juliet, who were traditionally played by older actors. Costars Leonard Whiting and Olivia Hussey display tangible chemistry, making the film the perfect, albeit heart-wrenching, Valentine's Day watch for young couples.

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"Roman Holiday" (1953)

Peck and Hepburn. Cast those two in leading roles, and you know you have yourself a romantic comedy that is the crème-de-la-crème — the best of what classic romance has to offer. Roman Holiday, a love-meets-adventure story, wasn't Hepburn's first role, but it was her first big one. Let's just say it most certainly put her on the map.

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Courtesy of 20th Century Fox
"The Seven Year Itch" (1955)

Marilyn Monroe did what Marilyn Monroe does best in The Seven Year Itch, a comedy that explores the reality of desire in monogamous marriage — and the perils of succumbing to those desires. The movie also shows one of the most iconic scenes in the history of film — Monroe, standing on the subway grate, her white halter dress aflutter.

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