This Is the Most Ingenious Way to Cut a Cake for a Crowd

Triangular slices are so overrated.

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Chelsea Lupkin

If you asked 100 people to cut a cake, 99 of them would likely slice the cake into even triangles. It's an all-too-common practice, and as math has proven, (particularly if you plan on having leftovers). But what about the flip side — the your kid's entire fourth grade class attended, despite half of them never RSVPing? Or when your second, third, and first-twice-removed cousins drop by a cookout unannounced?

Or, heaven forbid, you make your — the cake you've been dying to eat all day — only to have those ingrates called friends announce "oh, a smaller piece than that!" and only eat two bites?

In all three scenarios, there's one simple solution: this cake-cutting technique. Australian baker , known for her neon drip cakes and for helping usher in the back in 2015, posted an Instagram video of a friend slicing into one of her treats. For the first time ever, people weren't as mesmerized by the cake itself as they were how it was sliced.

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INSTAGRAM/KATHERINE_SABBATH

Sabbath's friend makes horizontal slices across the cake, flipping the one-inch thick slab of cake onto a cutting board. From there, she cuts it into one-inch strips, creating columns of cake. Using this technique, a cake that'd normally serve 6 to 8 (when sliced into triangles) can serve 30. Sure, they're getting smaller pieces, but you can always go back for seconds. Or thirds.

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INSTAGRAM/KATHERINE_SABBATH

It's been watched almost 1.3 million times in a little more than a week, and though the technique may seem odd, it's one professional bakers and caterers often use at weddings to make it easier to divvy up larger layer cakes, like this:

Check out the full technique, which commenters are calling "game changing," here:

A post shared by (@katherine_sabbath) on

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